becomebraver:

I HAVE FOUND THE CUTEST THING ON THE INTERNET

becomebraver:

I HAVE FOUND THE CUTEST THING ON THE INTERNET

danmayart:

prints & originals now available… danmay.bigcartel.com #danmay #studiosale

danmayart:

prints & originals now available… danmay.bigcartel.com #danmay #studiosale

august-morales:

Stop the violence

august-morales:

Stop the violence

katwaterflame:

josiephone:

Apparently some vegans are telling people not to eat honey to support bees.STOP. STOP NOW.DO YOU EVEN KNOW HOW BEES WORK?Buy honey (local if possible) -> support beekeepers -> support bees.I swear people don’t even think this stuff out. Beekeepers provide bees with an environment in which they can live, and are encouraged to thrive. Bees then have a big huge giant person who can deal with any threats to the hive. Yes, honey is a winter food supply for bees, but beekeepers (unless they’re dicks, in which case they’d be shooting themselves in the foot) will NEVER take too much honey from a hive, and will always ensure that bees have enough food. Think about it, you’re not going to starve a source of income/hobby, are you?So now.Support beekeepers.Support bees.buzz.

I had to reblog just for “DO YOU EVEN KNOW HOW BEES WORK?" because it made me realize that some people really don’t!

katwaterflame:

josiephone:

Apparently some vegans are telling people not to eat honey to support bees.

STOP. STOP NOW.
DO YOU EVEN KNOW HOW BEES WORK?

Buy honey (local if possible) -> support beekeepers -> support bees.

I swear people don’t even think this stuff out. 
Beekeepers provide bees with an environment in which they can live, and are encouraged to thrive. Bees then have a big huge giant person who can deal with any threats to the hive. 
Yes, honey is a winter food supply for bees, but beekeepers (unless they’re dicks, in which case they’d be shooting themselves in the foot) will NEVER take too much honey from a hive, and will always ensure that bees have enough food. Think about it, you’re not going to starve a source of income/hobby, are you?

So now.
Support beekeepers.
Support bees.

buzz.

I had to reblog just for “DO YOU EVEN KNOW HOW BEES WORK?" because it made me realize that some people really don’t!

requested by sammygiiirl

Moonlight drowns out all but the brightest stars.

"This is commander. Anything that’s mobile, that moves in the zone, even if it’s a three-year-old, needs to be killed. Over."

Captain R, an Israeli army officer who repeatedly shot a 13-year-old Palestinian girl in Gaza in 2004.

The Guardian reported:

"[Captain R] dismissed a warning from another soldier that she was a child by saying he would have killed her even if she was three years old. The officer… was charged… with illegal use of his weapon, conduct unbecoming an officer and other relatively minor infractions after emptying all 10 bullets from his gun’s magazine into Iman al-Hams [the child killed] when she walked into a “security area” on the edge of Rafah refugee camp…

The case came to light after soldiers under the command of Captain R went to an Israeli newspaper to accuse the army of covering up the circumstances of the killing. A subsequent investigation by the officer responsible for the Gaza strip, Major General Dan Harel, concluded that the captain had “not acted unethically”.

However, the military police launched an investigation, which resulted in charges against the unit commander. Iman’s parents have accused the army of whitewashing the affair by filing minor charges against Captain R. They want him prosecuted for murder.”

The Zionist narrative of “self-defense” breaks down pretty quickly when you know stories like this. 

(via america-wakiewakie)

If Hank Green hasn’t used ‘having a hankering for _____’ as a pun the world is a dark place.

fotojournalismus:

Israel/Palestine

"I’ve really tried to understand the Israelis. I used to work on a farm in Israel. I speak Hebrew. I watch their news. All the time they talk about fear. How they have to run to their bunkers to hide from the rockets. How their children can’t sleep because of the sirens. This is not a good way for them to live.

We Palestinians don’t talk about fear, we talk about death. Our rockets scare them; their rockets kill us. We have no bomb shelters, we have no sirens, we have nowhere we can take our children and keep them safe. They are scared. We are dying.” — Mohammed al-Khoudry, a Palestinian farmer, said in 2012.

According to Gaza’s Ministry of Health, 98 Palestinians have been killed so far and over 600 injured in Israel’s assault on the besieged coastal enclave. In the deadliest single attack since the offensive began, at least seven Palestinian civilians, including five children, were killed when Israeli warplanes bombed several homes in a densely populated area where the victims were sleeping. Bodies were pulled from the rubble of at least three homes and neighbouring buildings. (x)

A Palestinian journalist was killed in central Gaza after his car was bombed. Video footage shows it had been marked as a media vehicle. The Israeli military says it has dropped 800 tonnes of bombs on 750 targets throughout Gaza, more than during its eight-day assault in late 2012. Hospitals in Gaza have been overwhelmed with victims and are running low on basic supplies. Egypt has opened up the Rafah border crossing to evacuate some of the wounded. (x)

All the pictures above were taken on July 10, 2014. Pictures on the left are from Israel and pictures on the right are from the Gaza Strip.

See the captions below:

First row:

1. Commuters wait for a bus in central Tel Aviv. (Finbarr O’Reilly/Reuters)

2. Palestinians standing behind the gate of Rafah crossing hold their passports as they try to cross into Egypt. (Ibraheem Abu Mustafa/Reuters)

Second row: 

1. Israelis take cover in an underground car park in Tel Aviv during a rocket attack by Palestinian militants from the nearby Gaza Strip. (Ahmad Gharabli/AFP/Getty Images)

2. Palestinian mourners carry the body of five-year-old boy Abdallah Abu Ghazal during his funeral in Beit Lahiya after he was killed in an Israeli air strike. (Mahmud Hams/AFP/Getty Images)

Third row:

1. A woman takes a photo with her mobile phone of a car damaged when the remains of a rocket intercepted by Israel landed in a Tel Aviv neighbourhood. (Finbarr O’Reilly/Reuters)

2. Palestinians search in the rubble of a destroyed house where eight members of the Al Haj family were killed in a strike early morning in Khan Younis refugee camp. (AP)

Fourth row:

1. Israeli soldiers ride on a tank to a position near Israel Gaza Border. (Ariel Schalit/AP)

2. Palestinian mourners chant slogans as they carry the bodies of eight members of the Al Haj family, who were killed in an Israeli missile strike early morning, during their funeral in Khan Younis refugee camp. (Khalil Hamra/AP)

Fifth row: 

1. Israelis take cover as siren sounds during rocket attack fired by Palestinians militants from Gaza in Tel Aviv. (Dan Balilty/AP)

2. Palestinian relatives of eight members of the Al Haj family, who were killed in a strike early morning, grieve in the family house during their funeral in Khan Younis refugee camp. (Khalil Hamra/AP)

(Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5)

How do we get to ‘peace’?

image

     The WARM Festival has come to a close, and while the planes bearing participants and presenters home to France and Libya and everywhere in between, the roles of films have stopped turning at Meeting Point, and fewer people slow as they pass the Cartooning for Peace banners along the river, my thoughts are still marked by the work I did, the people I met, and the things I saw. I study conflict. War. Genocide. Identity turned into armor and knives. How the scars of grandparents mar the baby smooth flesh of new generations. And I study how to stop conflict. How to heal. How to remember and when to forget. This conference positioned me at the precipice of great opportunity for working on these issues in this field and has strengthened my resolve in doing this work, but sitting through a film that had experienced war journalists and photographers leaving mid-screening for respite is bound to leave it marks. So while I can’t imagine dedicating my life to anything less than addressing this unbearable suffering borne by millions every day, I am also left with great sorrow for all our failures to actually succeed in doing so.

     The mission of PCRC is to cultivate an environment for sustainable peace in Bosnia and Herzegovina and the greater Balkans region using creative multimedia projects that foster tolerance, moral courage, mutual understanding, and positive change. Wonderful. Works with local and international groups and actors, including journalists, photographers, researchers, filmmakers, non-governmental organizations, and educational institutions to contribute to a brighter future for this country and the region? Excellent. Empowers Bosnia-Herzegovina’s internal resources for peacebuilding while helping to maximize contributions made by the international community? Inspired. But to understand the broader problem that PCRC works to address requires first a discussion of a number of crucial definitions.

     First, what does it mean to be ‘post-conflict’? According to Junne and Verokren, post-conflict is a “conflict situation in which open warfare has come to an end. Such situations remain tense for years or decades and can easily relapse into large-scale violence.” Essentially, and as I have heard numerous times in reference to the present situation in Bosnia-Herzegovina, in post-conflict areas there is an absence of war, but not essentially real peace. Lakhdar Brahimi states that “the end of fighting does propose an opportunity to work towards lasting peace, but that requires the establishment of sustainable institutions, capable of ensuring long-term security.” It is within this window of opportunity that PCRC is working to rebuild Bosnian society and communal relations towards a true and lasting peace.

     But then what is peace? The limitation holding back the efforts at reconstruction and reconciliation in Bosnia and other post-conflict states is often the extended use of a negative rather than positive definition of peace. Negative peace is at its most basic refers to the absence of outright violence and conflict, such as the peace established with the signing of a ceasefire agreement. It is called ‘negative’ because it is used to describe the absence of something, such as extrajudicial killings, oppression, censorship, political incarceration, etc. Positive peace, however, is used to describe the presence of something, such as restoration of relationships, the creation of social systems that serve the needs of the whole population and the constructive resolution of conflict. State institutions in Bosnia have failed to implement changes that would build towards a sustainable positive peace, such as supporting the full range of transitional justice mechanisms to redress the legacies of massive human rights abuses, including criminal prosecutions, truth commissions, reparations programs, and various kinds of institutional reforms.

     All of the concerns of modern Bosnia-Herzegovina are inherently the concerns of a post-conflict state and are therefore of interest to PCRC as they engage in efforts for peacebuilding, reconciliation, transformation, and justice. This mission—building sustainable peace in Bosnia-Herzegovina and the broader Balkan region—is as ambitious as it is important, and it could certainly be extended beyond these borders as conflicts rage and states struggle to recover from their aftermath around the world. While I’ve been struggling with my own questions of what can and should I do to address these problems, it is more important to ask what can PCRC and organizations like it do. First, they have to work together—there must be cooperation with other individuals, NGOs, international and local actors, etc. Second, raising awareness and educating the public is among the most important actions they can take. It is crucial to teach younger generations so that they can move beyond divisions and hatreds to support change and peace. But it’s not just the youth that need to be educated, to have the reality of life in countries such as Syria revealed to them. I can’t imagine that anyone would remain passive and voiceless to the plight of the citizens of Aleppo or Homs after viewing Silvered Water, Syria Self-Portrait. Which connects to a third action PCRC and similar organizations can do to bring meaningful change—lobby governments to take action either on the national or international level. Demand intervention into the Syrian conflict, demand religion be removed from state schools, demand that national minorities be allowed to hold high political offices.

     But these are just examples of some of the things NGOs can do to impart change. Broader changes in general and globally need to take place for the positive peace to be effectively and truly established. The first and most important is a change in the way individuals think about themselves, their communities, their countries, and the world. Suffering is allowed to persist when we allow our universe of moral obligation to be shrunk by lack of understanding, manipulation of politicians, or simply fear, when we can only sympathize with the pain of people of our country, region, ethnicity, religion, or class. You can’t support a war when you can imagine and feel responsible to a family who might die because of it. Other broad social, technological, and cultural developments need to take place as well. Strides must be taken to move from a negative to a positive conception of peace, utilizing the previously discussed distinction. There must be greater collaboration and cooperation between the government and civil society. There must be universal respect and protection of human rights and freedoms. And there must be disarmament. Essentially, there is still quite a bit of work that needs to take place before PCRC and organizations like it will be rendered obsolete, and there is still a lot of growth and change that we need to go through. Let’s hope that this change will happen soon.

Street art Sarajevo.

Street art Sarajevo.

Street art Sarajevo.

Street art Sarajevo.

Street art in action.